12.2 / Fonts / Types & Type styles

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12.2 / Metal Types

12.2 / The English Collection

Roman /

Baskerville Old Face (M169) / Bell (M169) / Bulmer (M169) / Old Style (Founders)

Sans Serif /

Baskerville Old Face (M169) / Bell (M169) / Bulmer (M169) / Old Style (Founders)

Transitional /

Baskerville Old Face (M169) / Bell (M169) / Bulmer (M169) / Old Style (Founders)

Decorative /

Baskerville Old Face (M169) / Bell (M169) / Bulmer (M169) / Old Style (Founders)

Egyptian & Slab Serif /

Baskerville Old Face (M169) / Bell (M169) / Bulmer (M169) / Old Style (Founders)

Ornament & Borders /

Baskerville Old Face (M169) / Bell (M169) / Bulmer (M169) / Old Style (Founders)

12.2 / The Clerkenwell Collection

The Clerkenwell Collection
Metal Type

Stephenson Blake is an engineering company based in Sheffield, England. The company was active from the early 19th century as a type founder, remaining until the 1990s as the last active type foundry in Britain, since when it has diversified into specialist engineering. The type foundry began operations in July 1818 by silversmith and mechanic William Garnett and toolmaker John Stephenson, financially supported by James Blake. That November, news came that the breakaway Caslon foundry (formed when William Caslon III left the original firm and acquired Joseph Jackson’s foundry in 1792§ (Caslon foundry 1716; 1764; etc. §) was put up for sale by William Caslon IV.

The Clerkenwell Collection
Metal Type

Stephenson Blake founders from 8 — 72pt:
Caslon Old Face, Caslon Old Face Italic, Chisel, Engraver’s Shaded, Fry’s Ornamented, Futura Light, Futura Medium, Futura Demi-Bold, Futura Bold, Grotesque 6, Marina & Palace Script, Modern 20, Modern 20 Italic, Thorne Shaded, Union Pearl.

The Clerkenwell Collection
Metal Type

Monotype 6 — 72pt:
Albertus, Blado Italic, Bodoni, Bodoni Bold,  Clarendon, Clarendon Bold, Gill Sans, Gill Sans Bold, Joanna, Joanna Italic, Pegasus, Poliphilus, Spartan, Univers, Walbaum, Walbaum Italic.

12.2 / Wood Letter

The Clerkenwell Collection
Wood Letter

Stephenson Blake is an engineering company based in Sheffield, England. The company was active from the early 19th century as a type founder, remaining until the 1990s as the last active type foundry in Britain, since when it has diversified into specialist engineering. The type foundry began operations in July 1818 by silversmith and mechanic William Garnett and toolmaker John Stephenson, financially supported by James Blake. That November, news came that the breakaway Caslon foundry (formed when William Caslon III left the original firm and acquired Joseph Jackson’s foundry in 1792§ (Caslon foundry 1716; 1764; etc. §) was put up for sale by William Caslon IV.

The Clerkenwell Collection
Wood Letter

A wide selection of Grotesques & Eygptions – from Narrow to Expanded, plus Albertus, some Roman & Italics & a few ‘exotics’ ranging from 4 line to 50 line.

4 line /

6 line /

8 line /

10 line /

12 line /

16 line /

18 line /

20 & 21 line /

22 line /

24 line /

30 line /

40 line /

12.2 / Sigma / The digital font (used on this site)

Heading 1
14/17 — Sigma Bold
PMS 418 / #51534a

Smith’s Rules
12.2 — Notes /
Fonts / Types & Type styles

Mr Smith is a craftsman, designer, typographer, printmaker, wordsmith & maker — he is of strong temperament & is chiefly concerned with good design, attention to detail, thorough practice & quality workmanship.

Heading 3
14/17 — Sigma
PMS 418 / #51534a

Smith’s Rules
12.2 — Notes /
Fonts / Types & Type styles

Mr Smith is a craftsman, designer, typographer, printmaker, wordsmith & maker — he is of strong temperament & is chiefly concerned with good design, attention to detail, thorough practice & quality workmanship.

Heading 5
14/17 — Sigma / Grotesque Number Six
PMS 417 / #125120
Smith’s Rules
12.2 — Notes /
Fonts / Types & Type styles
Mr Smith is a craftsman, designer, typographer, printmaker, wordsmith & maker — he is of strong temperament & is chiefly concerned with good design, attention to detail, thorough practice & quality workmanship.

 

Heading 2
14/17 — Sigma
PMS 419 / #212322

Smith’s Rules
12.2 — Notes /
Fonts / Types & Type styles

Mr Smith is a craftsman, designer, typographer, printmaker, wordsmith & maker — he is of strong temperament & is chiefly concerned with good design, attention to detail, thorough practice & quality workmanship.

Heading 4
14/17 — Sigma / Grotesque Number Six
PMS grey/off-white / #efeeed

Smith’s Rules
12.2 — Notes /
Fonts / Types & Type styles

Mr Smith is a craftsman, designer, typographer, printmaker, wordsmith & maker — he is of strong temperament & is chiefly concerned with good design, attention to detail, thorough practice & quality workmanship.

Heading 6
14/17 — Sigma
PMS 416 / #7e7f74
Smith’s Rules
12.2 — Notes /
Fonts / Types & Type styles
Stephenson Blake’s Grotesque series. No. 6 was released in 1880–82 / and is credited to Elisha Pechey [Reichardt]

 

Paragraph
14/17 — Sigma
PMS Cool grey 9 / #76777b (maybe)

Smith’s Rules
12.2 — Notes /
Fonts / Types & Type styles

Stephenson Blake’s Grotesque series. No. 6 was released in 1880–82 / and is credited to Elisha Pechey [Reichardt]

Heading 7
14/17 — Sigma
PMS 419 / #212322

Smith’s Rules
12.2 — Notes /
Fonts / Types & Type styles

Mr Smith is a craftsman, designer, typographer, printmaker, wordsmith & maker — he is of strong temperament & is chiefly concerned with good design, attention to detail, thorough practice & quality workmanship.

 

Stephenson Blake is an engineering company based in Sheffield, England. The company was active from the early 19th century as a type founder, remaining until the 1990s as the last active type foundry in Britain, since when it has diversified into specialist engineering.

The type foundry began operations in July 1818 by silversmith and mechanic William Garnett and toolmaker John Stephenson, financially supported by James Blake. That November, news came that the breakaway Caslon foundry (formed when William Caslon III left the original firm and acquired Joseph Jackson’s foundry in 1792§ (Caslon foundry 1716; 1764; etc. §) was put up for sale by William Caslon IV. In 1819 the deal was concluded and Blake, Garnett & Co. were suddenly in charge of one of England’s most prestigious typefoundries. In 1829 Garnett left to become a farmer. The company was renamed Blake & Stephenson in 1830, but Blake died soon after. It became Stephenson, Blake & Co. in 1841-1905. John Stephenson died in 1864, the year after he handed control to his son Henry. In 1905 the firm purchased Sir Charles Reed and Sons Ltd. It was then known as Stephenson, Blake & Co., and Sir Charles Reed and Sons between 1905-1914. In 1914, without any change in proprietorship, the business was converted into a private limited liability company. The early 1900s the foundry had ventured into steel making and tool production, which would prove to be the core business of the current firm Stephenson, Blake and Co., Ltd. from until 2004 when Tom Blake (5th Generation) retired.[1]

Stephenson Blake is an engineering company based in Sheffield, England. The company was active from the early 19th century as a type founder, remaining until the 1990s as the last active type foundry in Britain, since when it has diversified into specialist engineering.

The type foundry began operations in July 1818 by silversmith and mechanic William Garnett and toolmaker John Stephenson, financially supported by James Blake. That November, news came that the breakaway Caslon foundry (formed when William Caslon III left the original firm and acquired Joseph Jackson’s foundry in 1792§ (Caslon foundry 1716; 1764; etc. §) was put up for sale by William Caslon IV. In 1819 the deal was concluded and Blake, Garnett & Co. were suddenly in charge of one of England’s most prestigious typefoundries. In 1829 Garnett left to become a farmer. The company was renamed Blake & Stephenson in 1830, but Blake died soon after. It became Stephenson, Blake & Co. in 1841-1905. John Stephenson died in 1864, the year after he handed control to his son Henry. In 1905 the firm purchased Sir Charles Reed and Sons Ltd. It was then known as Stephenson, Blake & Co., and Sir Charles Reed and Sons between 1905-1914. In 1914, without any change in proprietorship, the business was converted into a private limited liability company. The early 1900s the foundry had ventured into steel making and tool production, which would prove to be the core business of the current firm Stephenson, Blake and Co., Ltd. from until 2004 when Tom Blake (5th Generation) retired.[1]

Stephenson Blake is an engineering company based in Sheffield, England. The company was active from the early 19th century as a type founder, remaining until the 1990s as the last active type foundry in Britain, since when it has diversified into specialist engineering.
The type foundry began operations in July 1818 by silversmith and mechanic William Garnett and toolmaker John Stephenson, financially supported by James Blake. That November, news came that the breakaway Caslon foundry (formed when William Caslon III left the original firm and acquired Joseph Jackson’s foundry in 1792§ (Caslon foundry 1716; 1764; etc. §) was put up for sale by William Caslon IV. In 1819 the deal was concluded and Blake, Garnett & Co. were suddenly in charge of one of England’s most prestigious typefoundries. In 1829 Garnett left to become a farmer. The company was renamed Blake & Stephenson in 1830, but Blake died soon after. It became Stephenson, Blake & Co. in 1841-1905. John Stephenson died in 1864, the year after he handed control to his son Henry. In 1905 the firm purchased Sir Charles Reed and Sons Ltd. It was then known as Stephenson, Blake & Co., and Sir Charles Reed and Sons between 1905-1914. In 1914, without any change in proprietorship, the business was converted into a private limited liability company. The early 1900s the foundry had ventured into steel making and tool production, which would prove to be the core business of the current firm Stephenson, Blake and Co., Ltd. from until 2004 when Tom Blake (5th Generation) retired.[1]

Stephenson Blake is an engineering company based in Sheffield, England. The company was active from the early 19th century as a type founder, remaining until the 1990s as the last active type foundry in Britain, since when it has diversified into specialist engineering.

The type foundry began operations in July 1818 by silversmith and mechanic William Garnett and toolmaker John Stephenson, financially supported by James Blake. That November, news came that the breakaway Caslon foundry (formed when William Caslon III left the original firm and acquired Joseph Jackson’s foundry in 1792§ (Caslon foundry 1716; 1764; etc. §) was put up for sale by William Caslon IV. In 1819 the deal was concluded and Blake, Garnett & Co. were suddenly in charge of one of England’s most prestigious typefoundries. In 1829 Garnett left to become a farmer. The company was renamed Blake & Stephenson in 1830, but Blake died soon after. It became Stephenson, Blake & Co. in 1841-1905. John Stephenson died in 1864, the year after he handed control to his son Henry. In 1905 the firm purchased Sir Charles Reed and Sons Ltd. It was then known as Stephenson, Blake & Co., and Sir Charles Reed and Sons between 1905-1914. In 1914, without any change in proprietorship, the business was converted into a private limited liability company. The early 1900s the foundry had ventured into steel making and tool production, which would prove to be the core business of the current firm Stephenson, Blake and Co., Ltd. from until 2004 when Tom Blake (5th Generation) retired.[1]

Stephenson Blake is an engineering company based in Sheffield, England. The company was active from the early 19th century as a type founder, remaining until the 1990s as the last active type foundry in Britain, since when it has diversified into specialist engineering.

The type foundry began operations in July 1818 by silversmith and mechanic William Garnett and toolmaker John Stephenson, financially supported by James Blake. That November, news came that the breakaway Caslon foundry (formed when William Caslon III left the original firm and acquired Joseph Jackson’s foundry in 1792§ (Caslon foundry 1716; 1764; etc. §) was put up for sale by William Caslon IV. In 1819 the deal was concluded and Blake, Garnett & Co. were suddenly in charge of one of England’s most prestigious typefoundries. In 1829 Garnett left to become a farmer. The company was renamed Blake & Stephenson in 1830, but Blake died soon after. It became Stephenson, Blake & Co. in 1841-1905. John Stephenson died in 1864, the year after he handed control to his son Henry. In 1905 the firm purchased Sir Charles Reed and Sons Ltd. It was then known as Stephenson, Blake & Co., and Sir Charles Reed and Sons between 1905-1914. In 1914, without any change in proprietorship, the business was converted into a private limited liability company. The early 1900s the foundry had ventured into steel making and tool production, which would prove to be the core business of the current firm Stephenson, Blake and Co., Ltd. from until 2004 when Tom Blake (5th Generation) retired.[1]

Stephenson Blake is an engineering company based in Sheffield, England. The company was active from the early 19th century as a type founder, remaining until the 1990s as the last active type foundry in Britain, since when it has diversified into specialist engineering.
The type foundry began operations in July 1818 by silversmith and mechanic William Garnett and toolmaker John Stephenson, financially supported by James Blake. That November, news came that the breakaway Caslon foundry (formed when William Caslon III left the original firm and acquired Joseph Jackson’s foundry in 1792§ (Caslon foundry 1716; 1764; etc. §) was put up for sale by William Caslon IV. In 1819 the deal was concluded and Blake, Garnett & Co. were suddenly in charge of one of England’s most prestigious typefoundries. In 1829 Garnett left to become a farmer. The company was renamed Blake & Stephenson in 1830, but Blake died soon after. It became Stephenson, Blake & Co. in 1841-1905. John Stephenson died in 1864, the year after he handed control to his son Henry. In 1905 the firm purchased Sir Charles Reed and Sons Ltd. It was then known as Stephenson, Blake & Co., and Sir Charles Reed and Sons between 1905-1914. In 1914, without any change in proprietorship, the business was converted into a private limited liability company. The early 1900s the foundry had ventured into steel making and tool production, which would prove to be the core business of the current firm Stephenson, Blake and Co., Ltd. from until 2004 when Tom Blake (5th Generation) retired.[1]

Stephenson Blake is an engineering company based in Sheffield, England. The company was active from the early 19th century as a type founder, remaining until the 1990s as the last active type foundry in Britain, since when it has diversified into specialist engineering.

The type foundry began operations in July 1818 by silversmith and mechanic William Garnett and toolmaker John Stephenson, financially supported by James Blake. That November, news came that the breakaway Caslon foundry (formed when William Caslon III left the original firm and acquired Joseph Jackson’s foundry in 1792§ (Caslon foundry 1716; 1764; etc. §) was put up for sale by William Caslon IV. In 1819 the deal was concluded and Blake, Garnett & Co. were suddenly in charge of one of England’s most prestigious typefoundries. In 1829 Garnett left to become a farmer. The company was renamed Blake & Stephenson in 1830, but Blake died soon after. It became Stephenson, Blake & Co. in 1841-1905. John Stephenson died in 1864, the year after he handed control to his son Henry. In 1905 the firm purchased Sir Charles Reed and Sons Ltd. It was then known as Stephenson, Blake & Co., and Sir Charles Reed and Sons between 1905-1914. In 1914, without any change in proprietorship, the business was converted into a private limited liability company. The early 1900s the foundry had ventured into steel making and tool production, which would prove to be the core business of the current firm Stephenson, Blake and Co., Ltd. from until 2004 when Tom Blake (5th Generation) retired.[1]